The Diabetes Industry – Laughing All the Way to the Bank

Of the UK population, we now have approximately 5% who have been diagnosed as diabetics, many more with pre-diabetic conditions and those who are as yet, undiagnosed. This includes both type 1 and type 2. Both types are growing exponentially and regardless of population increase. They are metabolic diseases.



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Novo Nordisk has set a long-term global target of providing quality diabetes care products (my emphasis) to 40 million people by 2020.”

“Providing” sounds so generous and altruistic doesn’t it? It’s meant to – we are supposed to believe in these qualities. The reality is that products are being sold all around the world, including to developing countries, where a large part of their diet comprises inexpensive carbohydrate foods. Since these countries are consuming the very foods that can bring about diabetes, it is a very profitable market.

Novo Nordisk is just one pharmaceutical company supplying insulin. Insulin and other diabetic drugs are needed by millions, so I am not dismissing them out of hand, but just pointing out that this is business. Diabetes is huge business so let’s look at this industry. Approximately 80% of diabetics are overweight or obese so I am going to include some of the “obesity industry” bullet-points in my list.

  • pharmaceutical companies make insulin and anti-diabetic drugs of several sorts. Insulin prescriptions cost £328 millions and Metformin (anti-diabetes drug) £81 millions
  • needles and syringes are needed
  • books about diabetes are written and sold
  • specialist nurses and doctors must be trained in diabetes and then salaried, therefore…
  • trainers are needed – and someone to train them!
  • bariatric surgeons to provide surgery for those who cannot lose weight. (This is currently being discussed for diabetics with a lower body-mass index than for those with obesity alone.)
  •  gastric-band manufacturers
  • manufacturers of bariatric beds, chairs, commodes, hoists and other equipment
  • “diabetic foods”
  • blood sugar monitors and a constant supply of “blood sticks”

 

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These points indicate the industry (and it is not an exhaustive list). These businesses would go out of business if there were no diabetics and obesity. The actual cost of diabetes is incredibly far-reaching. Since diabetics have much more chance of becoming ill due heart disorders, lower limb problems even amputations and blindness, or whether just from minor infections – diabetics have more absence days from work than healthy people. They cost the work-place money – 8.4 billion per year. )LINK) There is a government benefits cost too for those that can’t work. The fact is, diabetics usually die younger. Harsh I know, but true nonetheless. What about the NHS? Hospital beds and GP surgeries are full of diabetics, due to all the complications that can be encountered by suffering diabetes. A simple statement which costs billions.

“The cost of diabetes to the NHS is over £1.5m an hour or 10% of the NHS budget for England and Wales. This equates to over £25,000 being spent on diabetes every minute.”

This is a disease that is, in the main, both preventable and reversible. Why is the research funding not directed at causes and prevention instead of maintenance drugs and cures? You answer.

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Statistics are from diabetes.co.uk.

Are Fungi and Yeasts a Threat to Our Health?

A couple of quotes from this study: “Fungal infections take more than 1.3 million lives each year worldwide, nearly as many as tuberculosis”. “..half of the world’s 350,000 asthma-related deaths each year stem from fungal infection..”

file2701293812299Yeasts and fungi are probably the most successful organisms on the planet. They do not necessarily require sunlight or oxygen and they use starches, glucose and other sugars for growth. This means they can grow pretty much anywhere as long as there as there is food and moisture – from the sludge at the bottom of the sea to mould on damp walls to us. Having more than one way to reproduce adds to their success too. They are often invisible – miles of mycelium (the underground “roots” of fungi) can be present in just a handful of soil, for example. Yeasts too are invisible to the naked eye unless they are part of a colony as in baker’s yeast or the bloom on the skin of some fruits. Just think what an advantage these attributes give to the life of these ubiquitous organisms! There are of course, many that are beneficial to us – some edible mushrooms have a wonderful array of nutrients and antioxidants.

Both yeasts and fungi can attack humans and they are one of our major killers worldwide. Even if they do not kill, they can cause suffering and misery.  “..half of the world’s 350,000 asthma-related deaths each year stem from fungal infection”  for example and Candida albicans can cause vaginal and oral thrush, skin problems and gut disturbances. In severely immune compromised people, Candida albicans can kill. There are other fungal/yeast infections that can affect humans such as aspergillus, ringworm and tinea (eg. athlete’s foot).

Severe infections with these organisms occur mostly in people who are immune compromised for some reason – A.I.D.S., treatment to prevent the rejection of a transplanted organ, cancer treatment and even pregnancy as this is a normal immune-suppressed state. (The baby shouldn’t be rejected!) However, if we eat incorrectly or if our immune systems have taken a knock for some reason, we are all at risk of mild or severe infection.

Including some fermented foods in our diet boosts our beneficial bacteria and this DSCF0577 keeps Candida in its place. It lives in our gut naturally but if we are healthy, it causes no problems. The main two ways that will change this balanced condition is if we feed it or if our gut microbes have been compromised for some reason. Candida can multiply rapidly and instead of being a few harmless yeast cells, it becomes an invasive colony. Yeasts need sugars for their growth and reproduction so if our diets are high in carbohydrate foods (which are broken down to sugars) – such as the doughnut, they get the chance to flourish. Many drugs but especially antibiotics, will disrupt the gut flora giving Candida a chance to gain a foothold. As a colony, it is able to put out microscopic rootlets which penetrate the delicate one-cell thick lining of the gut. This creates the condition known as leaky-gut syndrome giving rise to a host of problems in the gut and systemically.

In nature, one sees fungi not only thriving in decaying wood and leaves but also invading dying or weak plants. If we are less than healthy with a poor immune system, we too become a target. Don’t let it be you.

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Selenium – The Elusive Mineral

The problem with obtaining the mineral selenium is that whilst many foods contain it, the amount varies enormously. There are areas of the world where soils are very low in this mineral and the same goes for the sea – thus even though seafood and land-food can contain good amounts, they only will if it is present. The reason we tend to have low levels is due to the modern diet coupled with the elusive nature of selenium.

Selenium is needed for correct cell function – therefore it is vital. As with all nutrients, they work with others as a co-factor in order to make anti-oxidants. Without these we cannot fight disease and become more prone to infections, cancers, heart disease, cognitive decline and more. See this article.

The thing to do is eat the correct diet for humans (see my blogs), buy organic or grow your own. For the rest, buy food from various retailers/producers thereby getting produce from a variety of geographical areas.

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Good food sources are:
Brazil nuts (just two daily is enough)
Other nuts
Pastured eggs and offal – especially kidneys
Seafood – especially shell-fish
Organic mushrooms

 

As usual, I recommend obtaining nutrients from organic food in preference to supplements, but there maybe a time when it is necessary. See a specialist!

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Acne – The Most Common Skin Disease in the Western World

The skin problem Acne Vulgaris is another condition of several combined factors – hormones, diet, infection, over-production of sebum (our skin oil) and possibly the way we wash. There may be others too.

1146989_45040779It is probably brought about by diet (although there are drugs and medical conditions that can cause acne, but they are rare).  Your diet and your health are inextricably linked and just being told “it’s your age and you’ll grow out of it” – is nonsense. Also, people well into their middle-age can suffer from acne – including me. In fact I had acne well into my 40s. It disappeared when I drastically changed my diet and my skin

So what of these other factors? Testosterone over-production is one (men and women produce this hormone). As we know acne is common in teenagers and this is the very time when hormones are buzzing. Interestingly, teenage acne is uncommon amongst primitive people eating a natural hunter-gatherer diet and very common in the Western World and countries with similar lifestyles.

Another factor is the bacteria on our skin. We are absolutely heaving with bacteria – both inside and out! Normally these live in harmony with each other and with us in fact we would not live long without them. Unfortunately, antibiotics are often prescribed for acne and whilst these may help temporarily, the protective bacteria may also be destroyed ensuring the condition returns.

Since “we are what we eat” it stands to reason that if you are eating a lot of foods that are not ideal, that your body fluids and structures will alter over time. The sebum (oil) in your skin will be not only over-produced but chemically changed.  Opportunist bacteria – that is the ones that don’t contribute to our health – see their chance to move in and create havoc, in this case – causing acne.

Yet another factor is indirectly to do with the sun as we make vitamin D from skin oils reacting with sunlight (the UVB rays). You may not be surprised to learn that vitamin D is needed for our immunity and for the production of hormones! Just a few thousand years ago we lived pretty much outside and our vitamin D levels would always have been high, very similar in fact, to primitive people now. We live and work indoors, use cars for transport and slather on high factor sunscreen before venturing outside. The Western World now has an epidemic of vitamin D deficiency. There is also some evidence that shows that the action of a moderate amount of sunlight directly on to acne-affected skin can improve the condition.

There are many medications for acne, but in my opinion, they only work temporarily and can damage our gut bacteria. A natural approach is a better option and these are my recommendations:
1) Adopt a low-carbohydrate diet which contains animal fats and not seed oils. Eat plenty of vegetables and eggs too. A low fat diet will not help and may make the condition worse.
2) Wash your skin twice a day only with a very mild, preferably unscented and un-perfumed skin-wash or better still use jojoba oil to cleanse. Lightly massage in, remove with tissue then wipe gently with a clean, damp cloth. This is very effective, as jojoba oil has a similar chemical profile to sebum and can dissolve it and remove grime at the same time. Add a drop of tea tree oil to the jojoba oil sometimes.
3) Get some sun!

This is not an overnight solution but changing your diet will, within a month for most people, show real benefits.

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Candida Albicans – The Main Cause of IBS? (IBS Part 5)

We live with yeasts. There are yeasts in the air we breathe, on the food we eat and living happily in our intestines. It is impossible to avoid them but fortunately, the healthy body has systems in place to keep yeast infections under control. Candida Albicans is the opportunist microbe and overgrows prolifically given the chance.

As I discussed before, medications and illnesses will deplete the beneficial gut bacteria and this allows the undesirables to proliferate and this can happen very quickly, especially if the diet is high in sugars and other carbohydrates. This is called dysbiosis – literally meaning , difficult life.

All yeasts have similar needs. If you have ever made bread or beer you know that mixing water, yeast and sugar in a warm place creates lots of bubbles. (Actually, if you used a spoonful of flour the effect would be the same.) This reaction is the result of yeasts feeding on sugar and multiplying. For Candida, the gut provides an ideal environment to set up home and have a big family. Friends will also be invited, but friends of Candida, not of us!

beerWhen bread or beer is made, the gases easily escape into the atmosphere but what happens if this fermentation goes on inside us? There is no immediate escape so gases build up causing much noise and often severe cramping pains. Eventually gas escapes as very smelly wind accompanied by acute embarrassment. Sometimes the gas does not escape easily and becomes trapped causing more pain and bloating. A story I hear often is that a bloated abdomen becomes apparent over the day and goes down overnight no doubt escaping during sleep.

So why the diarrhoea that often typifies IBS? When the yeast Candida colonises in the gut is becomes less of a yeast and more of a fungus. The organisms join forces and start to line the gut wall, anchoring with minute rootlets into the intestines. When this happens, there is little room for the good guys to colonise which means the delicate lining becomes eroded as there is no protection. Food cannot be digested and absorbed properly which means it leaves the body rapidly and barely altered from when it was eaten. Another likely scenario is that instead of being absorbed as nutrients, other unwanted microbes cause the food to putrefy adding to the toxic load. Whilst these effects are going to cause much discomfort and distress, another very troublesome situation is occurring – malnutrition.

This is the disaster that will almost certainly perpetuate or worsen the illness. We take for granted that our food will be digested once eaten but it is an extremely complex process – one which is dependent upon all areas of the gut doing their bit before the food is moved on to the next stage. With IBS these stages can be inadequate or missed out altogether. The end result is that nutrients are not absorbed and the body’s digesting fluids and enzymes cannot be created. Many other processes cannot be instigated. The vicious circle continues and we get sicker.

Next time, I will tell you the story of Micaela Stafford. This was a lady I met a few years ago who had the most severe form of gut dysbiosis I have ever witnessed. She has allowed me to tell her story.

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The Price of Health – part 1

Success is always measured by money isn’t it? We all need money to live and I’m not knocking it, but cheap food is not a good investment in our health. Apart from anything else, if you haven’t got your health, you will have nothing – maybe not even the ability to work.

file0001911591111Many diseases are on the increase. Auto-immune diseases such as Crohn’s disease,  multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis; gut disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and food sensitivities; allergies such as asthma and to peanuts; even rickets (due to vitamin D deficiency) has returned and the list goes on and on.

What has happened? Why, when we “know” so much, are we seeing more chronic illness? The answers are simple but they are interpreted wrongly (accidentally or intentionally).  In so many instances, the information released to the public becomes very complicated.  It is usually given in sound-bites (eg. in newspaper articles) and the research on which information is given is often flawed. This of course means that the advice will change in a few years, by which time much damage is already done. (Remember how we were told to eat polyunsaturated fats instead of butter? Not now!)

Before I explore why good health has become complex and elusive and why you have to spend more money on food, I will itemise the reasons why I believe chronic illness is now a way of life:

1)    Our food has been tampered with

2)    Medications

3)    We have been told to stay out of the sun

4)    We have been advised to eat a diet which is largely unsuitable for human beings

5)    We over-exercise or not at all

6)    Famous people are putting their names to big brands

7)    Greed for money and power, has overtaken our population

8)    Smoking

9)    Overuse of germ killing household and personal products

There are many other factors involved but as I want to keep this reasonably brief, I will not be expanding on them. They include vaccinations which have been written about extensively – some articles are here.

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It may be interesting for you to see the pattern in the illnesses frequently suffered:

Wrong diet as children +
Lack of the sun +
Persuasion to eat wrong foods (No.4 as above) +
Too little exercise
Equals -
Insulin sensitivity – obesity, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, poor circulation
and could equal
Loss of vision, infections, loss of sensation in feet, gangrene, strokes, heart disease etc.

Whilst treatment for chronic symptoms may prolong life, they will not cure. They will almost certainly produce side effects which range from unpleasant to downright dangerous.

Is this what we want? Or how about this one? – another frequently seen scenario:

Bottle-fed as a baby +
Carbohydrate (nutrient-poor) based diet +
Antibiotics for repeated ear/throat/other infections +
Lack of sunshine +
(possibly the contraceptive pill later in life)
Could equal
Asthma, food sensitivities, more infections/antibiotics, intermittent diarrhoea/constipation, thrush
Could equal
IBS (irritable bowel syndrome), further sensitivities and allergies
c
ould equal
Autoimmune diseases – Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, celiac disease
could equal
Dependence on steroid drugs and/or invasive surgery to remove part of the bowel and create a colostomy.

Part two next time, in which I will expand on those factors that have lead to chronic illness and why it is folly to buy cheap food.

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Winter Bugs

The cold weather is here! It can be miserable at this time of the year – no sun, it’s cold, windy and wet, Christmas is looming. We do not want to be ill! Here are a few precautions and some things you can do to head the bugs off at the pass!

Prevention: this is the most important aspect of your health and there is no substitute. To maximise the efficiency of your immune system, you should increase intake of fish and shell fish, meat and its fat, eggs, offal and green leafy vegetables. Make bone broth as a basis for soup and consider taking a supplement of krill or cod liver oil (preferably fermented). Remember that a diet high in carbohydrate foods, adds sugar to your body as all carbs are broken down to glucose – the simplest form of sugar. Having a constantly raised glucose level, slows down the action of our white cells, which combat infection.

Hand washing is imperative as a control of infections. In our daily lives we shake hands with people, open doors, use toilets, press lift buttons, use telephones, push shopping trolleys and more. These are all potential sources of infection. There is no need to be paranoid but we should all be careful. Wash and dry your hands thoroughly and frequently during the day, but always before eating or preparing food, after using the loo and when returning home from work, shopping etc. Perhaps wear gloves when out and about.

Have a couple of baths a week using essential oils to boost your immune system. Add a total of four drops from any of these; marjoram, thyme, tea tree, eucalyptus, lavender, and cinnamon. A mixture is best. Epsom salts in the bath will boost your magnesium levels – needed for immune health, and this can also induce sound sleep – another boost.

A few teaspoons of coconut oil and fresh sauerkraut each day will help balance your gut microbes – the foundation of the immune system.

So what do you do if you get a bug? Go to bed. Sleep as much as your body requires. Drink plenty of water/herb teas/broth and only eat if you are hungry. A teaspoon of raw honey -manuka, lavender, rosemary (but all raw honey can help) and a pinch of (Himalayan crystal or Celtic grey) salt dissolved in a litre of warm water is helpful if you have a stomach bug. Sip over 6-8 hours. If you are able, take baths as before. Try to stay away from others especially children, the elderly and those who have compromised immunity – eg. those who have been ill recently or are on medication.
If you feel you need something to help with symptoms, paracetamol may help but try to keep it to night time so that you get a good sleep.

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The body is quite able to repair itself and fight infection without help but if you are worried or the illness does not seem to be improving, get advice from your doctor by phone. You will not be welcome at the surgery!

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The Flu

The flu vaccination programme is well underway now.  It is not my intention to sway your opinion regarding this either way, but I would urge that you base your views on fact rather than hype. Do some research – there is plenty about. Here is just one article.

A good immune system is the most precious attribute you can have and nothing can replace it. There are also lots of remedies for colds and flu – some based in science, some just money-makers. Here are some of the best things you can do to boost immunity – and these are free or cost little. They may avert infection all together, but even if you do contract a virus, you may suffer less and recover more quickly. Life is not without health problems but a healthy body is natures way of ensuring that the species is not wiped out.

  • Reduce carbohydrates and sugar. Your blood glucose rises as a result of their metabolism and can coat the white cells, rendering them less able to do their job of clearing up infective organisms.
  • Enjoy traditional warming foods such as soups made from bone stock, stews and casseroles made from meat with bone (eg, scrag end of neck of lamb for lamb stew).  Try thinly sliced organic liver and onions cooked in lots of butter too.
  • Have a cheese omelette for breakfast instead of cold cereal. Or maybe porridge (not instant) served with cream and a little sweetener if desired. Adding animal fat to meals or eating meat with its fat ensures a good supply of the fat-soluble vitamins needed for good immunity. (Vitamin A used to be called the “anti-infectious vitamin” but we now know that these vitamins work together. It is therefore best to consume the packages that nature cleverly supplies for us – butter, cream, organic (preferably raw) full cream milk (not homogenised), liver, eggs, shellfish and oily cold-water fish.
  • Don’t use seed oils either for cooking or as margarine nor those that say “olive oil margarine”. These compromise our immunity both by being very prone to rancidity and their ability to upset the Omega 3 and 6 balance. There are so many other oils and fats to use instead – olive oil, coconut oil, duck and goose fat, lard, dripping, butter and they all taste much better too.
  • Get your vitamin C from leafy green vegetables, tomato juice, tangerines, grapefruits, parsley etc. Drinking fruit juice will increase you intake of sugars too much.
  • Include some natural full-fat yogurt or fresh sauerkraut in your diet for probiotic bacteria.
  • Get plenty of sleep.
  • Get some exercise. Walking is fine.
  • If you succumb to an infection – rest! Have a warm bath and use 4 drops of essential oils – choose from tea-tree, marjoram, lavender, chamomile – preferably a mixture of two or three. Drink plenty of water or herb teas.

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It is never too late to start eating properly. It is a true investment into your health and will pay great dividends.